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The Secret Life of Plantsep3
Do plants have something to say?
Dr Jordan DowellDr Jordan DowellHD, subtitles, Q&ATranscript43m
We often think of plants as organisms left on their own to survive. Seemingly still and unable to make any noise they managed to fight with the rollercoaster of evolution. But plants talk to each other. So, what do they talk about?

When walking into nature, we often hear the water flowing in a river, birds singing, or another wild animal expressing itself. But we don’t often realise that there is a very vibrant but inaudible community out there constantly exchanging valuable information for their survival: plants.

Plants secretly talk to each other through their roots as well as invisible volatile compounds. They inform each other of potential threats, such as an infection or an insect, as well as collaborate on how to share resources. They even developed dialects. But sometimes collaboration may convert into competition for resources, at which point communicating with each other might not be in plants' best interest.

Jordan Dowell, a postdoctoral researcher of Plant Chemical Ecology & Comparative Biochemistry at the University of California Davis, will join us in the garden to translate the fascinating language plants adopt every day.

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HD, subtitles, Q&ATranscript

The Secret Life of Plants

Plants have long been cast as the backdrop to the brassier, noisier human and animal world. But new research is revealing another side of our botanical friends, and this time it's a starring role. What have they been up to while we were looking elsewhere?

3 talks
Interactive Q&A
Series guide

Top audience questions
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Do plants send out warnings to all other plant species or can they only communicate within their own species/family/genus?
10 votes
Has selective breeding and/or gm compromised plants ability to communicate?
8 votes

Thank you so much Dr. Dowell…you were absolutely amazing. Denis
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