What happens in the brain when you meditate?

Prof. Steven Laureys

Meditation - training your attention and awareness to reach a calm and stable state - is an ancient practice found all over the world and used in the modern day to manage stress. What's going on in your brain when you achieve this level of focus?

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Meditation is an ancient practice, originating in Asia but found in religious traditions all over the world (and particularly popular with monks of all denominations!). Today, meditation - the act of training your attention and awareness in order to achieve a calm and stable mental and physical state - is widely used to achieve wellbeing and manage health conditions like stress, anxiety, depression and chronic pain. But how does it work, and what's going on in your brain when you meditate?

Prof. Steven Laureys runs the GIGA Consciousness and Coma Science Group at the University of Liège, Belgium, and has conducted ground-breaking research into human consciousness for more than 20 years. Steven is an award-winning neurologist and the author of The No-Nonsense Meditation Book: A scientist’s guide to the power of meditation. In his research for this book, Steven studied and scanned the brains of all kinds of expert meditators, including Buddhist monks.

Steven joins us in The Garden to explore the effect that meditation has on the brain and how it produces its incredible results. No woo-woo; just hard science and groundbreaking research. Don't miss out.

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Talk outline

Duration

50 minutes

What to expect

30 minute talk

20 minute Member Q&A

Prof. Steven Laureys

Steven founded the GIGA Consciousness and Coma Science Group at the University of Liège, Belgium, where his team of 60 people studies consciousness in all its forms, from anaesthesia to dreaming.

Thank you notes from Garden members

Stress & the Body Collection

Stress. Your heart races, you feel overwhelmed, you may get dizzy or hot or sweaty. At some point in our lives we have all experienced that feeling, but what is actually happening to our bodies from a scientific perspective when our minds are under stress?