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Growing Up & Growing Oldep1
At what age do you become responsible for your actions?
Prof. Leah SomervilleProf. Leah SomervilleHD, subtitles, Q&ATranscript48m
The law has to decide at what age someone should be held accountable for their actions. What does neuroscience tell us about when that should be?
Is age a good marker of how mature your brain is?

Legally speaking, there has to be an age of responsibility - a clear point at which a child becomes an adult and is therefore responsible for their actions. But, instinctively, we know that this is an artificial distinction, and neuroscience agrees: different parts of the brain mature at different rates, and as with puberty some people develop faster than others.

How do scientists think about the concept of maturity when it comes to the brain? And how do they translate the complexity of their research to navigate questions of responsibility and consent? Prof. Leah Somerville runs the Affective Neuroscience & Development Laboratory at Harvard University, and she'll be joining us in The Garden to wrestle with these important and fascinating questions.

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HD, subtitles, Q&ATranscript

Growing Up & Growing Old

"It is sad to go to pieces like this but we all have to do it," said Mark Twain. But do we, really? Our crack team of Garden Fellows are thinking differently about growing up and growing old, and they're here to help you do the same.

3 talks
Interactive Q&A
Series guide

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Sorry everyone, we're having some issues with the Q&A today, limiting who can post questions. Please email your questions to laura@onegarden.com or text them to +447739068979 instead.
8 votes
Eris asks "How can you associate a pain in the past to gray area that "doesn't matter" so it could be get rid of, by using the power of the fact that the brain is still growing?"
6 votes

Thank you for this talk, amazing to get this insight from you Prof Leah. I'll be carrying on the conversation! Peter

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