Dr. Veronique Oldham

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Veronique is an assistant professor at the University of Rhode Island's Graduate School of Oceanography. She examines metal cycling in the coastal ocean, deep sea methane seeps, and in Antarctica.

Dr. Veronique Oldham

About Veronique Oldham

Veronique Oldham is a trace metal chemist, who studies the flow of energy in our oceans. Hailing from Canada, Veronique has always had an interest in the environment and the oceans, and her career began during an internship at the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences. There, she met her would be PhD advisor, and moved to Delaware to pursue research on manganese and iron chemistry in environments ranging from the coastal ocean, to deep sea hydrothermal vents.

Following her PhD, Veronique accepted a Post Doctoral Scholarship at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, the largest oceanographic non-profit organization in the world. There, she examines metal cycling in the coastal ocean, deep sea methane seeps, and in Antarctica. For the last two years, Veronique has been an assistant professor at the University of Rhode Island's Graduate School of Oceanography. She runs a trace metal lab, and is working on examining metal cycles along oxygen gradients in the Gulf of Mexico; the formation of particles in the Southern Ocean; and the bacterial formation of solids for wastewater remediation.

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